Degree Department

States

The Reforms of Beauford Halbert Jester's Administration, 1947-1949 (open access)

The Reforms of Beauford Halbert Jester's Administration, 1947-1949

Beauford Halbert Jester, thirty-sixth governor of Texas, had served nearly six months of his second term when he died on July 11, 1949. He tends to be remembered as the only Texas governor to die in office, but his accomplishments deserve greater recognition. Elected as the Establishment candidate in a bitter campaign against a liberal opponent, Jester had a surprisingly progressive administration. During his tenure the state generally expanded its services, began a prison reform program, reorganized the public school system, began an ambitious farm-to-market road program, attempted a new approach to juvenile delinquency, expanded educational opportunities for blacks, created a legislative redistricting board, and established a building fund for state-supported colleges and universities.
Date: May 1984
Creator: Lowe, Billie Lynne
System: The UNT Digital Library
Livestock Legacy: A History of the Fort Worth Stockyards Company 1893-1982 (open access)

Livestock Legacy: A History of the Fort Worth Stockyards Company 1893-1982

This dissertation outlines the creation and history of the Fort Worth Stockyards Company from its conception to the time of this dissertation's publication. The Fort Worth Stockyards Company was created by Greenleif W. Simpson and Louville V. Niles. This company would soon cement Fort Worth as the premier livestock producer in America, soon surpassing Chicago.
Date: August 1982
Creator: Pate, J'Nell L.
System: The UNT Digital Library
Quest for Equality: An Historical Overview of Women's Rights Activism in Texas, 1890-1975 (open access)

Quest for Equality: An Historical Overview of Women's Rights Activism in Texas, 1890-1975

This study presents a chronological examination of women's rights activism. The first three chapters cover the origin, growth, and success of the Texas woman suffrage movement. Chapter Four examines the issues of interest to Texas women after the right to vote was achieved, including birth control, better working conditions, unionization, jury duty, and married women's property rights. The last chapters explore the origins, growth, and success of the movement to secure an Equal Legal Rights Amendment to the state constitution, and its immediate aftermath. Sources include manuscript collections, interviews, newspaper and magazine accounts, and government documents.
Date: August 1982
Creator: Gammage, Judie Walton
System: The UNT Digital Library
Presidential Reconstruction in Texas 1865-1867 (open access)

Presidential Reconstruction in Texas 1865-1867

Presidential reconstruction in Texas proceeded under the direction of provisional governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton, a Texas Unionist. Texas Unionists had deep political roots in pre-war politics and sought to reconstruct along moderate lines. Following the constitutional convention of 1866, conservative James Webb Throckmorton won the gubernatorial race against Unionist Elisha Marshall Pease. Throckmorton's administration did very little to curb the intense violence directed at Unionists in Texas, and the conservative legislature passed legislation repressive to blacks. Texas Unionists grew increasingly radical, and Throckmorton clashed with the federal military over the question of authority. After the Radicals in Congress passed the Reconstruction Acts, Throckmorton was removed as governor, and E.M. Pease was appointed in his place, ending presidential reconstruction in Texas.
Date: December 1979
Creator: Chapin, Walter T.
System: The UNT Digital Library