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25--30 T water cooled pulse magnet concept for neutron scattering experiment (open access)

25--30 T water cooled pulse magnet concept for neutron scattering experiment

The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory is in need of a high field, split-pair, pulse magnet that would provide a 25--30 T field in a 25 mm bore and 10 mm split gap for 2--4 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Single stack Bitter magnets of this type providing less than 20 T vertical field in the split gap have been constructed before. To produce higher fields, there is a need to use a multiple layer coil with internal reinforcement. The magnet should withstand up to 10{sup 7} cycles of loading and unloading. The authors have conducted a feasibility study that address these unique requirements.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Eyssa, Y. M.; Walsh, R. P.; Miller, J. R.; Pernambuco-Wise, P.; Bird, M. D.; Schneider-Muntau, H. J. et al.
Object Type: Article
System: The UNT Digital Library
105-N basin sediment disposition phase-two sampling and analysis plan (open access)

105-N basin sediment disposition phase-two sampling and analysis plan

The sampling and analysis plan for Phase 2 of the 105-N Basin sediment disposition task defines the sampling and analytical activities that will be performed to support characterization of the sediment and selection of an appropriate sediment disposal option.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
120-D-1 (100-D) ponds training plan (open access)

120-D-1 (100-D) ponds training plan

This is the Environmental Restoration Contractor Team training plan for the 100-D Ponds treatment, storage, and disposal unit. This plan is intended to meet the requirements of WAC 173-303-330 and the Hanford Dangerous Waste Permit. The WAC 173-303-330(1)(d)(ii, v, vi) requires that personnel be familiar, where applicable, with waste feed cut-off systems, proper responses to groundwater contamination incidents, shutdown of operations, response to fire or explosion, and other process operation activities.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Mitchem, G. B.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
183-H Solar Evaporation Basins PostClosure Plan (open access)

183-H Solar Evaporation Basins PostClosure Plan

The 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins (183-H) have certified closure under a modified closure option available in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit under Condition II.K.3. The following information contains a description of the unit, past closure actions, and postclosure care requirements subject to compliance under the Permit. Corrective actions required for dangerous waste constituents remaining at 183-H will occur in conjunction with Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act remedial actions for the 100-HR-1 Source Operable Unit and the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Badden, J.W.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
300 Area Process Trenches Supplemental Information to the Hanford Contingency Plan (DOE/RL-93-75) (open access)

300 Area Process Trenches Supplemental Information to the Hanford Contingency Plan (DOE/RL-93-75)

The 300 Area Process Trenches are surface impoundments which were used to receive routine discharges of nonregulated process cooling water from operations in the 300 Area and dangerous waste from several research and development laboratories and the 300 Area Fuels Fabrication process. Discharges to the trenches ceased in 1994, and they were physically isolated in 1995. Remediation of the trenches is scheduled to begin during July 1997. Currently, there are no waste management activities required at the 300 Area Process Trenches and the unit does not present any significant hazards to adjacent units, personnel, or the environment. It is unlikely that any incidents presenting hazards to public health or the environment would occur at the 300 Area Process Trenches, however, during remediation, exposure, spill, fire, and industrial hazards will exist. This contingency plan addresses the emergency organization, equipment and evacuation routes pertinent to the process trenches during remediation
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Carlson, R.A.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
1996 National Awards Program for Energy and Renewable Energy final report (open access)

1996 National Awards Program for Energy and Renewable Energy final report

DOE hired Renew America to coordinate the 1996 National Awards Programs for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This report provides an overview of the 1996 program including planning, application distribution, evaluation and award ceremony. A few observations about the program`s structure and recommendations for the 1997 awards program are included.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
1997 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site (open access)

1997 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site

The 1997 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 1997 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates tat current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the US Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that these residues do not pose any significant risk to human health or the environment.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
1997 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility (open access)

1997 environmental monitoring report for the Naval Reactors Facility

The results of the radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs for 1997 at the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) are presented in this report. The results obtained from the environmental monitoring programs verify that releases to the environment from operations at NRF were in accordance with state and federal regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data confirms that the operation of NRF continues to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment or the health and safety of the general public. Furthermore, a conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of NRF operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits prescribed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Energy (DOE).
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report (open access)

1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Meyers, C. E.; Harvey, C. L.; Chavez, D. L. & Whiddon, C. P.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Accelerator-driven destruction of long-lived radioactive waste and energy production (open access)

Accelerator-driven destruction of long-lived radioactive waste and energy production

Nuclear waste management involves many issues. ATW is an option that can assist a repository by enhancing its capability and thereby assist nuclear waste management. Technology advances and the recent release of liquid metal coolant information from Russia has had an enormous impact on the viability of an ATW system. It now appears economic with many repository enhancing attributes. In time, an ATW option added to present repository activities will provide the public with a nuclear fuel cycle that is acceptable from economic and environmental points of view.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Schriber, S. O.
Object Type: Article
System: The UNT Digital Library
An accelerator-driven reactor for meeting future energy demand (open access)

An accelerator-driven reactor for meeting future energy demand

Fissile fuel can be produced at a high rate using an accelerator-driven Pu-fueled subcritical fast reactor which avoids encountering a shortage of Pu during a high growth rate in the production of nuclear energy. Furthermore, the necessity of the early introduction of the fast reactor can be moderated. Subcritical operation provides flexible nuclear energy options along with high neutron economy for producing the fuel, for transmuting high-level waste such as minor actinides, and for efficiently converting excess and military Pu into proliferation-resistant fuel.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Takahashi, Hiroshi; Yang, Y. & Yu, A.
Object Type: Article
System: The UNT Digital Library
Actinide immobilization in the subsurface environment by in-situ treatment with a hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus complexant: Uranyl uptake by calcium phytate (open access)

Actinide immobilization in the subsurface environment by in-situ treatment with a hydrolytically unstable organophosphorus complexant: Uranyl uptake by calcium phytate

In addition to naturally occurring uranium and thorium, actinide ions exist in the subsurface environment as a result of accidental releases and intentional disposal practices associated with nuclear weapons production. These species present a significant challenge to cost-effective remediation of contaminated environments. An attractive approach to decreasing the probability of actinide migration in the subsurface is to transform the ions into a less mobile form by remote treatment. We have under development a process which relies on a polyfunctional organophosphorus complexant to sequester the mobile metal ions by complexation/cation exchange in the near term, and to subsequently decompose, transforming the actinides into insoluble phosphate mineral forms in the long term. Studies to date include identification of a suitable organophosphorus reagent, profiling of its decomposition kinetics, verification of the formation of phosphate mineral phases upon decomposition of the reagent, and extensive comparison of the actinide uptake ability of the calcium salt of the reagent as compared with hydroxyapatite. In this report, we briefly describe the process with focus on the cation exchange behavior of the calcium salt of the organophosphorus sequestrant.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Nash, K. L.; Jensen, M. P. & Schmidt, M. A.
Object Type: Article
System: The UNT Digital Library
[Advanced accelerator R and D program]. Final report (open access)

[Advanced accelerator R and D program]. Final report

This proposal requests funding for a 3-year renewal of the DOE advanced accelerator R and D (AARD) program at Texas A and M University. The program to date has focused on the development of the gigatron, a compact high-efficiency microwave driver for future linear colliders. The author reports results and progress in that project, and plans to bring it to a milestone and conclusion by mid-1995. He proposes to initiate a second project, the development of a new technology for ultra-high field superconducting magnets for future hadron colliders. This project builds upon two magnet designs which he has introduced during the past year, which have the potential for a dramatic extension of the achievable field strength for both dipoles and quadrupoles.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997 (open access)

Advanced byproduct recovery: Direct catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

The team of Arthur D. Little, Tufts University and Engelhard Corporation are conducting Phase 1 of a four and a half year, two-phase effort to develop and scale-up an advanced byproduct recovery technology that is a direct, single-stage, catalytic process for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur. This catalytic process reduces SO{sub 2} over a fluorite-type oxide (such as ceria and zirconia). The catalytic activity can be significantly promoted by active transition metals, such as copper. More than 95% elemental sulfur yield, corresponding to almost complete sulfur dioxide conversion, was obtained over a Cu-Ce-O oxide catalyst as part of an on-going DOE-sponsored, University Coal Research Program. This type of mixed metal oxide catalyst has stable activity, high selectivity for sulfur production, and is resistant to water and carbon dioxide poisoning. Tests with CO and CH{sub 4} reducing gases indicate that the catalyst has the potential for flexibility with regard to the composition of the reducing gas, making it attractive for utility use. The performance of the catalyst is consistently good over a range of SO{sub 2} inlet concentration (0.1 to 10%) indicating its flexibility in treating SO{sub 2} tail gases as well as high concentration streams. The principal objective of …
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced Emission Control Development Program. (open access)

Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Evans, A.P.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1997 (open access)

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, July 1--September 30, 1997

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997 (open access)

Advanced gas turbine systems research. Technical quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

Major accomplishments by AGTSR during this reporting period are highlighted and then amplified in later sections of this report. Main areas of research are combustion, heat transfer, and materials. Gas turbines are used for power generation by utilities and industry and for propulsion.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced hot-gas filter development (open access)

Advanced hot-gas filter development

Coal is the most abundant fossil-fuel resource in the United States. `Clean coal` technologies, such as pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC), require a hot gas filter to remove the corrosive and erosive coal ash entrained in the combustion gas stream. These hot gas filters, or candle filters, must be cost-effective while able to withstand the effects of corrosion, elevated temperature, thermal shock, and temperature transients. Ash loadings may range from 500 to 10,000 ppm by weight, and may contain particles as fine as 0.008 mils. The operating environment for the hot gas filter can range in pressure from 10 to 20 atm, in temperatures from 700 to 1750{degrees}F, and can be oxidizing or reducing. In addition, the process gases may contain volatile chloride, sulfur, and alkali species. Field testing of various commercially available, porous, ceramic filter matrices has demonstrated a loss of up to 50 percent of as-manufactured strength after 1,000 to 2,000 hours of exposure to these operating conditions, although full-scale elements have remained intact during normal process operations. Ultramet, a small business specializing in advanced materials R&D, has developed a new class of hot gas filter materials that offers lower back-pressure, higher permeability, longer …
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Stankiewicz, E.P.; Sherman, A.J. & Zinn, A.A.
Object Type: Article
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced hot gas filter development. Topical report, May 1995--December 1996 (open access)

Advanced hot gas filter development. Topical report, May 1995--December 1996

Porous iron aluminide was evaluated for use as a particulate filter in pressurized fluid-bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycles (IGCC) with a short term test. Three alloy compositions were tested: Fe{sub 3}Al 5% chromium (FAL), Fe{sub 3}Al 2% chromium (FAS) and FeAl 0% chromium. The test conditions simulated air blown (Tampa Electric) and oxygen blown (Sierra Pacific) gasifiers with one test gas composition. Four test conditions were used with hydrogen sulfide levels varying from 783 ppm to 78,3000 ppm at 1 atmosphere along with temperatures ranging between 925 F and 1200 F. The iron aluminide was found capable of withstanding the proposed operating conditions and capable of giving years of service. The production method and preferred composition were established as seamless cylinders of Fe{sub 3}Al 2% chromium with a preoxidation of seven hours at 1472 F.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Hurley, J. L. & June, M. R.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers (open access)

Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Murdoch, L.; Siegrist, B. & Meiggs, T.
Object Type: Article
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report (open access)

Advanced Lost Foam Casting technology: 1997 summary report

Previous research made significant advances in understanding the Lost Foam Casting (LFC) Process and clearly identified areas where additional research was needed to improve the process and make it more functional in an industrial environment. The current project focused on eight tasks listed as follows: Task 1--pyrolysis defects and sand distortion; Task 2--bronze casting technology; Task 3--steel casting technology; Task 4--sand filling and compaction; Task 5--coating technology; Task 6--precision pattern production; Task 7--computational modeling; and Task 8--project management and technology transfer. This report summarizes the work done under the current contract in all eight tasks in the period of October 1, 1995 through December 31, 1997.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced Membrane Devices. Interim Report for the Period October 1996--September 1997 (open access)

Advanced Membrane Devices. Interim Report for the Period October 1996--September 1997

Under this Cooperative Agreement, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has continued to investigate and develop improved membrane technology for removal of carbon dioxide from natural gas. The task schedule for this reporting period included a detailed assessment of the market opportunity (Chapter 2), continued development and evaluation of membranes and membrane polymers (Chapter 3) and a detailed economic analysis comparing the potential of Air Products membranes to that of established acid gas removal processes (Chapter 4).
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Laciak, D. V.; Langsam, M.; Lewnard, J. J. & Reichart, G. C.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced Sulfur Control Concepts in Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology. Quarterly Report, April 1--June 30, 1997 (open access)

Advanced Sulfur Control Concepts in Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology. Quarterly Report, April 1--June 30, 1997

Three areas of research were pursued during the past quarter. Experimental CeO{sub 2} sulfidation and regeneration tests examined the effect of SO{sub 2} concentration and gas flow rate on the production of elemental sulfur during regeneration. The maximum number of cycles using a single sorbent charge was increased to 13, and initial tests using a second source of CeO{sub 2} (from Molycorp, Inc.) were carried out. In the process analysis effort, a third case study based on single-stage desulfurization using CeO{sub 2} sorbent was added. Capital and operating costs for this option were estimated under base case conditions. The sensitivity of the annual levelized cost of all three cases to variations in sorbent durability, sorbent unit cost, O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} unit cost, and capital cost was examined. As the sorbent cost was reduced, based on smaller sorbent replacement rate and/or smaller sorbent unit cost, the annual levelized cost of all three processes decreased, and the cerium process became more attractive. For example, at a sorbent replacement rate of 0.1% of the sorbent circulation rate, both cerium processes should be less costly than the single-stage zinc sorbent process. As the sorbent replacement rate approaches zero (infinite sorbent lifetime), income …
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Harrison, D. P.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Advanced Sulfur Control Concepts in Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology. Quarterly Report, October 1--December 31, 1997 (open access)

Advanced Sulfur Control Concepts in Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology. Quarterly Report, October 1--December 31, 1997

This quarter, the authors turned their attention to sorbent durability studies by beginning a multicycle run. By the end of the quarter, nineteen complete cycles had been completed with little or no evidence of sorbent deactivation. Prebreakthrough H{sub 2}S concentrations below the thermal conductivity detector limit of about 100 ppmv were achieved in all cycles. The time, t{sub 0.5}, required for the H{sub 2}S concentration in the product gas to reach 0.5% (50% of the inlet concentration) varied only between 97 and 106 minutes in the 19 cycles. Significant, t{sub 0.5} for the 19th cycle was 103 minutes, among the largest of all cycles. SO{sub 2} breakthrough during regeneration showed similar good reproducibility. t{sub 0.5} for regeneration only varied between 20.6 and 22.9 minutes. The concentration of elemental sulfur (considered as S{sub 2}) in the product gas exceeded 10% for more than 15 minutes in each cycle. By the end of December, the sorbent had been exposed continuously to temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for more than one month in gas compositions ranging from 100% H{sub 2} to air, and from 1% H{sub 2}S/10% H{sub 2}N{sub 2} to 12% SO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}. Between regeneration and sulfidate, the system …
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Harrison, D. P.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library