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Freedom of Information Act Amendments: 109th Congress (open access)

Freedom of Information Act Amendments: 109th Congress

This report discusses the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), which was designed to enable any person — individual or corporate, regardless of citizenship — to request, without explanation or justification, presumptive access to existing, identifiable, unpublished, executive branch agency records on any topic.
Date: February 25, 2005
Creator: Relyea, Harold C.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Homosexuals and U.S. Military Policy: Current Issues (open access)

Homosexuals and U.S. Military Policy: Current Issues

This report discusses policy towards homosexuals in the U.S. military service. In 1993, new laws and regulations pertaining to homosexuals and U.S. military service came into effect reflecting a compromise in policy. This compromise, colloquially referred to as “don’t ask, don’t tell,” holds that the presence in the armed forces of persons who demonstrate a propensity or intent to engage in homosexual acts would create an unacceptable risk to the high standards of morale, good order and discipline, and unit cohesion which are the essence of military capability. Service members are not to be asked about nor allowed to discuss their homosexuality. This compromise notwithstanding, the issue has remained politically contentious.
Date: February 10, 2005
Creator: Burrelli, David F. & Dale, Charles V.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Journalists' Privilege to Withhold Information in Judicial and Other Proceedings: State Shield Statutes (open access)

Journalists' Privilege to Withhold Information in Judicial and Other Proceedings: State Shield Statutes

This report briefly provides an overview of general trends among the states individual statutes.
Date: March 8, 2005
Creator: Lening, Carey & Cohen, Henry
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Floor Procedure in the House of Representatives: A Brief Overview (open access)

Floor Procedure in the House of Representatives: A Brief Overview

The House considers bills and resolutions on the floor under several different sets of procedures governing the time for debate and the opportunities for amendment. Some procedures allow 40 or 60 minutes for debate; others permit debate to continue until a majority of Members vote to end it. Some procedures prohibit most or all floor amendments; others allow Members to offer any amendments that meet the requirements of the House’s rules and precedents. Notwithstanding these differences, the rules, precedents, and practices of the House generally are designed to permit the majority to work its will in a timely manner. This report provides a brief overview of this procedure.
Date: March 15, 2005
Creator: Rybicki, Elizabeth & Bach, Stanley
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Invoking Cloture in the Senate (open access)

Invoking Cloture in the Senate

This report discuses cloture, which is is the only procedure by which the Senate can vote to set an end to a debate without also rejecting the bill, amendment, conference report, motion, or other matter it has been debating. A Senator can make a nondebatable motion to table an amendment, and if a majority of the Senate votes for that motion, the effect is to reject the amendment. Thus, the motion to table cannot be used to conclude a debate when Senators still wish to speak and to enable the Senate to vote for the proposal it is considering. Only the cloture provisions of Rule XXII achieve this purpose.
Date: February 9, 2005
Creator: Davis, Christopher M.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Tracking Current Federal Legislation and Regulations: A Guide to Basic Sources (open access)

Tracking Current Federal Legislation and Regulations: A Guide to Basic Sources

This report introduces selected basic sources that are useful in obtaining background information or specific facts on the status of federal legislative or regulatory initiatives. It includes telephone, online, and media sources are included, as well as pertinent directories, such as those of organizations that track areas of interest. Annotations describing each source's contents and organization are included so that researchers can select those that most closely fit their needs. Internet addresses usually provide information about the items, rather than access to them.
Date: January 13, 2005
Creator: Davis, Carol D.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
House and Senate Rules of Procedure: A Comparison (open access)

House and Senate Rules of Procedure: A Comparison

This report compares selected House and Senate rules of procedure for various stages of the legislative process: referral of legislation to committees; scheduling and calling up measures; and floor consideration.
Date: February 10, 2005
Creator: Schneider, Judy
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
How Measures Are Brought to the House Floor: A Brief Introduction (open access)

How Measures Are Brought to the House Floor: A Brief Introduction

This report presents a brief description of the five methods used to bring proposed legislation to the House floor for consideration.
Date: January 11, 2005
Creator: Saturno, James V.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Tsunamis: Monitoring, Detection, and Early Warning Systems (open access)

Tsunamis: Monitoring, Detection, and Early Warning Systems

This report discusses proposals for international tsunami early warning systems and examines U.S. policy regarding tsunamis.
Date: January 24, 2005
Creator: Morrissey, Wayne A.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library
Access to Government Information in the United States (open access)

Access to Government Information in the United States

The Constitution of the United States makes no specific allowance for any one of the co-equal branches to have access to information held by the others and contains no provision expressly establishing a procedure for, or a right of, public access to government information. Nonetheless, Congress has legislated various public access laws. These include two records access statutes — the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552) and the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 552a) — and two meetings access statutes — the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) and the Government in the Sunshine Act (5 U.S.C. 552b). Moreover, due to the American separation of powers model of government, interbranch conflicts over the accessibility of information are neither unexpected nor necessarily destructive. The federal courts, historically, have been reluctant to review and resolve “political questions” involving information disputes between Congress and the executive branch. Although there is considerable interbranch cooperation, such conflicts probably will continue to occur on occasion.
Date: January 7, 2005
Creator: Relyea, Harold C.
Object Type: Report
System: The UNT Digital Library

San Jacinto Monument

Photograph of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. Most of the monument is visible, including the frieze near the base and the top of the column.
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Detail of frieze on the San Jacinto Monument

Photograph of a portion of the frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. The visible corner is labeled "Lamar's School System" and shows three children lined up in front of a woman holding an open book and a man standing in the background. Portions of other images are also visible.
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Frieze of San Jacinto Monument, San Jacinto Advance

Photograph of a frieze of the San Jacinto Monument. Two men on the far left advance to the right, above the words "Houston and Deaf Smith." Carved into the middle section of the frieze are many men with guns. A drummer and piper stand to the left, a man rides a horse in the middle, and two men roll a cannon forward on the right. The words "San Jacinto Advance" are engraved under the frieze. On the far right side, above the words "Lamar's School System," several children sit at desks in front of a woman who stands next to a tall man.
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Colonists Forced the Mexican Authorities

Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It says: "In June, 1832, the colonists forced the Mexican authorities at Anahuac to release Wm. B. Travis and other from unjust imprisonment, the battle of Velasco, June 26, and the Battle of Nacogdoches, August 2, followed; in both the Texans were victorious. Stephen Fuller Austin, "Father of Texas," was arrested January 3, 1834, and held in Mexico without trial until July, 1835. The Texans formed an army, and on November 12, 1835, established a provisional government."
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Early Policies of Mexico

Photograph of engraved writing near the base of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It reads: "The early policies of Mexico toward her Texas colonists had been extremely liberal. Large grants of land were made to them, and no taxes or duties imposed. The relationship between the Anglo-Americans and Mexicans was cordial. But, following a series of revolutions begun in 1829, unscrupulous rulers successively seized power in Mexico."
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, The First Shot

Photograph of engraved text at the base of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. There is a family walking next to the monument. Text: The first shot of the revolution of 1835-36 was fired by the Texans at Gonzales, October 2, 1835, in resistance to a demand by the Mexican soldiers for a small cannon held by the colonists. The Mexican garrison at Goliad fell October 9; the Battle of Concepción was won by the Texans October 28. San Antonio was captured December 10, 1835 after five days of fighting in which the indomitable Benjamin R. Milam died a hero, and the Mexican army evacuated Texas.
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

San Jacinto Monument

San Jacinto Monument
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Frieze of San Jacinto Monument, Building of Industries

Photograph of a portion of the frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. The segment is labeled "Building of Industries" and depicts men with shovels and beams on the left, men on horseback herding cattle in the center, and men with an oil derrick on the right. Partial images are visible on either side, labeled "Lamar's School System" on the left and "Stephen F. Austin Undertakes Texas Colonization" on the right.
Date: May 4, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Texas Declared her Independence

Photograph of writing on side of the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It had decorative stonework above. Text: Texas declared her independence at Washington-on-the-Brazos March 2. For nearly two months her armies met disaster and defeat: Dr. James Grant's men were killed on the Agua Dulce March 2; William Barret Travis and his men sacrificed their lives at the Alamo, March 6; William Ward was defeated at Refugio, March 14; Amon B. King's men were executed near Refugio, March 16; and James Walker Fannin and his army were put to death near Goliad March 27, 1836.
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, On This Field

Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte. It reads: "On this field on April 21, 1836 the army of Texas commanded by General Sam Houston, and accompanied by the Secretary of War, Thomas J. Rusk, attacked the larger invading army of Mexicans under General Santa Anna. The battle line from left to right was formed by Sidney Sherman's regiment, Edward Burleson's regiment, the artillery commanded by George W. Hockley, Henry Millard's infantry and the cavalry under Mirabeau B. Lamar. Sam Houston led the infantry charge."
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: unknown
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Frieze of San Jacinto Monument, Coming of the Pioneers

Photograph of the San Jacinto Monument featuring a frieze, "Coming of the Pioneers." Two couples, and a man, and a horse stand in front of a wagon. All three men hold rifles. To the left, there is another frieze, showing a man with a rifle facing a woman holding a piece of paper in her hands.
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, With the Battle Cry

Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte. It reads: "With the battle cry, "Remember the Alamo! Remember Goliad!" the Texans charged. The enemy, taken by surprise, rallied for a few minutes then fled in disorder. The Texans had asked no quarter and gave none, the slaughter was appalling, victory complete, and Texas free! On the following day General Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, self-styled "Napoleon of the West," received from a generous foe the mercy he had denied Travis at the Alamo and Fannin at Goliad."
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Citizens of Texas

Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte, Texas. It says: "Citizens of Texas and immigrant soldiers in the army of Texas at San Jacinto were natives of Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, Austria, Canada, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Poland, Portugal and Scotland."
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History

Engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument, Measured by its Results

Photograph of an engraved frieze on the San Jacinto Monument in La Porte. It reads: "Measured by its results, San Jacinto was one of the decisive battles of the world. The freedom of Texas from Mexico won here led to annexation and to the Mexican War, resulting in the acquistion by the United States of the states of Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, California, Utah and parts of Colorado, Wyoming, Kansas and Oklahoma, almost one-third of the present area of the American nation, nearly a million square miles of territory, changed sovereignty."
Date: May 2, 2005
Creator: Belden, Dreanna L.
Object Type: Photograph
System: The Portal to Texas History