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Oral History Interview with Rula Walid Bibi, April 24, 2011

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Interview with Rula Walid Bibi, Palestinian-born immigrant to Plano, Texas, for the DFW Metroplex Immigrants Oral History Project. The interview includes Bibi's personal experience with discrimination of Palestinians in the Middle East, childhood in Kuwait City, education at the University of Kuwait and Midwestern State University, family experiences during the First Gulf War and circumstances surrounding her immigration to Texas in 1990, thoughts on religion, experiences as a single mother as well as experiences of living in Wichita Falls, Dallas, Richardson, Garland, and Plano. Bibi talks about her first impressions of the U.S., her career in medical technologies, her marriage to an American man and his conversion to Islam, her involvement with political organizations, and thoughts on American education and foreign policy.
Date: April 24, 2011
Creator: Abigail, R. Matthew & Bibi, Rula Walid
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

The Year of Perfect Happiness

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The sharp-witted stories in Becky Adnot-Haynes' debut collection explore the secret lives of people—how they deal with the parts of themselves that they choose not to share with their closest confidants—and with the world. A pole-vaulter practices his sport only before dawn. A recently divorced woman signs up for a hallucinogenic drug excursion in the Arizona desert. An uncertain girlfriend goes out into the world wearing a false pregnancy belly. In The Year of Perfect Happiness, the universe is recognizable but slightly askew, a world whose corners can be peeled back to reveal the strange and often comic outcomes of acting out your most self-destructive desires. It is also a winner ofKatherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction Series.
Date: November 2014
Creator: Adnot-Haynes, Becky
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Ensemble: 2015-11-18 – African Percussion Ensemble

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A percussion ensemble recital performed at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: November 18, 2015
Creator: African Percussion Ensemble
Object Type: Sound
System: The UNT Digital Library

Ensemble: 2011-03-31 – African Cultural Festival

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Concert presented at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: March 31, 2011
Creator: Afrikania Cultural Troupe
Object Type: Sound
System: The UNT Digital Library

Ensemble: 2015-04-11 - African Cultural Festival

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An ensemble concert performed at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: April 11, 2015
Creator: Afrikania Cultural Troupe
Object Type: Sound
System: The UNT Digital Library

Ensemble: 2011-04-02 – African Cultural Festival

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Concert presented at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: April 2, 2011
Creator: Afrikania Cultural Troupe & Alorwoyie, Torgbui Midawo Gideon Foli
Object Type: Sound
System: The UNT Digital Library

Ensemble: 2017-04-08 – 20th Annual African Cultural Festival of Traditional Ethnic Music and Dance

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African percussion ensemble concert performed at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: April 8, 2017
Creator: Afrikania Cultural Troupe of Ghana
Object Type: Video
System: The UNT Digital Library

Ensemble: 2018-04-14 – 21st Annual African Cultural Festival of Traditional Ethnic Music and Dance

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World ensembles concert performed at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: April 14, 2018
Creator: Afrikania Cultural Troupe of Ghana
Object Type: Video
System: The UNT Digital Library

Ensemble: 2019-03-30 – 22nd Annual African Cultural Festival of Traditional Ethnic Music and Dance

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World ensembles concert performed at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: March 30, 2019
Creator: Afrikania Cultural Troupe of Ghana
Object Type: Video
System: The UNT Digital Library

Information Sharing and Storage Behavior via Cloud Computing: Security and Privacy in Research and Practice and Users' Trust

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This research contributes to the cloud computing (CC) literature and information science research by addressing the reality of information sharing and storage behavior (ISSB) of the users' personal information via CC. Gathering information about usage also allows this research to address the paradox between the research and practice. Additionally, this research explores the concept of trust and its role in the behavioral change relative to CC. The findings help reconcile the paradox between the two realms. Essay1 develops and tests cloud computing usage model (CCUM) that assesses ISSB. This model considers the main adoption determinants and the main drawbacks of CC. The study measures the main concerns of users found in the literature, perceived security and perceived privacy. The findings prove surprising on these concerns. Using multiple regression to analyze 129 valid survey responses, the results find that CC users are less concerned about the major issues of security and privacy and will use the technology based on peer usage. Essay 2 examines why users ignore the technology issues and elect to replace the traditional mechanisms for handling their personal information. The results of an interview-based study conducted on 11 normal users and 11 IT professionals clarify their perceptions about …
Date: May 2019
Creator: Al Smadi, Duha
Object Type: Thesis or Dissertation
System: The UNT Digital Library

Master's Recital: 2016 04-17 - Erin Alcorn, soprano

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Master's recital presented at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
Date: April 17, 2016
Creator: Alcorn, Erin
Object Type: Video
System: The UNT Digital Library

Master's Recital: 2016-04-17 – Erin Alcorn, soprano

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Recital presented at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall in partial fulfillment of the Master of Music (MM) degree.
Date: April 17, 2016
Creator: Alcorn, Erin
Object Type: Sound
System: The UNT Digital Library

Three Essays on Internet of Things Adoption and Use

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Internet of Things (IoT) is a promising technology with great potential for individuals, society, governments, and the economy. IoT is expected to become ubiquitous and influence every aspect of everyday experience. Thus, IoT represents an important phenomena for both organizational and behavioral information system (IS) researchers. This dissertation seeks to contribute to IS research by studying the aspects that influence IoT adoption and use at both consumer and organizational levels. This dissertation achieves this purpose in a series of three essays. The first essay focuses on IoT acceptance in the context of smart home. The second essay focuses on examining the effect of artificial intelligence (AI) capabilities on consumers' IoT perceptions and intentions. Finally, the third essay focuses on the organizational investment and adoption of IoT technologies.
Date: May 2019
Creator: Aldossari, Mobark
Object Type: Thesis or Dissertation
System: The UNT Digital Library

Bad Company and Burnt Powder: Justice and Injustice in the Old Southwest

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Bad Company and Burnt Powder is a collection of twelve stories of when things turned "Western" in the nineteenth-century Southwest. Each chapter deals with a different character or episode in the Wild West involving various lawmen, Texas Rangers, outlaws, feudists, vigilantes, lawyers, and judges. Covered herein are the stories of Cal Aten, John Hittson, the Millican boys, Gid Taylor and Jim and Tom Murphy, Alf Rushing, Bob Meldrum and Noah Wilkerson, P. C. Baird, Gus Chenowth, Jim Dunaway, John Kinney, Elbert Hanks and Boyd White, and Eddie Aten. Within these pages the reader will meet a nineteen-year-old Texas Ranger figuratively dying to shoot his gun. He does get to shoot at people, but soon realizes what he thought was a bargain exacted a steep price. Another tale is of an old-school cowman who shut down illicit traffic in stolen livestock that had existed for years on the Llano Estacado. He was tough, salty, and had no quarter for cow-thieves or sympathy for any mealy-mouthed politicians. He cleaned house, maybe not too nicely, but unarguably successful he was. Then there is the tale of an accomplished and unbeaten fugitive, well known and identified for murder of a Texas peace officer. But …
Date: July 2014
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Old Riot, New Ranger: Captain Jack Dean, Texas Ranger and U.S. Marshal

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Award-winning author Bob Alexander presents a biography of 20th-century Ranger Captain Jack Dean, who holds the distinction of being one of only five men to serve in both the Officer’s Corps of the Rangers and also as a President-appointed United States Marshal. Jack Dean’s service in Texas Ranger history occurred at a time when the institution was undergoing a philosophical revamping and restructuring, all hastened by America’s Civil Rights Movement, landmark decisions handed down by the United States Supreme Court, zooming advances in forensic technology, and focused efforts designed to diversify and professionalize the Rangers. His job choice caused him to circulate in the duplicitous underworld of dishonesty and criminality where twisted self-interest overrode compliance with societal norms. His biography is packed with true-crime calamities: double murders, single murders, negligent homicides, suicides, jailbreaks, manhunts, armed robberies and home invasions, kidnappings, public corruption, sexual assaults, illicit gambling, car-theft rings, dope smuggling, and arms trafficking. “Bob Alexander personally interviewed Jack Dean, a renowned Texas lawman who wore a badge for forty-three years. These conversations form the core of a well-researched and fascinating account of Lone Star justice from the mid-twentieth century into the new millennium.” —Darren L. Ivey, author of The Ranger …
Date: July 2018
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Rawhide Ranger, Ira Aten: Enforcing Law on the Texas Frontier

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Ira Aten (1862-1953) was the epitome of a frontier lawman. At age twenty he enrolled in Company D during the transition of the Rangers from Indian fighters to topnotch peace officers. This unit—and Aten—would have a lively time making their mark in nineteenth-century Texas. The preponderance of Texas Ranger treatments center on the outfit as an institution or spotlight the narratives of specific captains. Bob Alexander aptly demonstrated in Winchester Warriors: Texas Rangers of Company D, 1874-1901 that there is merit in probing the lives of everyday working Rangers. Aten is an ideal example. The years Ira spent as a Ranger are jam-packed with adventure, border troubles, shoot-outs, solving major crimes—a quadruple homicide—and manhunts. Aten’s role in these and epochal Texas events such as the racially insensitive Jaybird/Woodpecker Feud and the bloody Fence Cutting Wars earned Ira’s spot in the Ranger Hall of Fame. His law enforcing deeds transcend days with the Rangers. Ira served two counties as sheriff, terms spiked with excitement. Afterward, for ten years on the XIT, he was tasked with clearing the ranch’s Escarbada Division of cattle thieves. Aten’s story spins on an axis of spine-tingling Texas history. Moving to California, Ira was active in transforming …
Date: July 15, 2011
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Riding Lucifer's Line: Ranger Deaths Along the Texas-mexico Border

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The Texas-Mexico border is trouble. Haphazardly splashing across the meandering Rio Grande into Mexico is—or at least can be—risky business, hazardous to one’s health and well-being. Kirby W. Dendy, the Chief of Texas Rangers, corroborates the sobering reality: “As their predecessors for over one hundred forty years before them did, today’s Texas Rangers continue to battle violence and transnational criminals along the Texas-Mexico border.” In Riding Lucifer’s Line, Bob Alexander, in his characteristic storytelling style, surveys the personal tragedies of twenty-five Texas Rangers who made the ultimate sacrifice as they scouted and enforced laws throughout borderland counties adjacent to the Rio Grande. The timeframe commences in 1874 with formation of the Frontier Battalion, which is when the Texas Rangers were actually institutionalized as a law enforcing entity, and concludes with the last known Texas Ranger death along the border in 1921. Alexander also discusses the transition of the Rangers in two introductory sections: “The Frontier Battalion Era, 1874-1901” and “The Ranger Force Era, 1901-1935,” wherein he follows Texas Rangers moving from an epochal narrative of the Old West to more modern, technological times. Written absent a preprogrammed agenda, Riding Lucifer’s Line is legitimate history. Adhering to facts, the author is …
Date: May 15, 2013
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands: The Wild West Life of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones

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Many well-read students, historians, and loyal aficionados of Texas Ranger lore know the name of Texas Ranger Captain Frank Jones (1856-1893), who died on the Texas-Mexico border in a shootout with Mexican rustlers. In Six-Shooters and Shifting Sands, Bob Alexander has now penned the first full-length biography of this important nineteenth-century Texas Ranger. At an early age Frank Jones, a native Texan, would become a Frontier Battalion era Ranger. His enlistment with the Rangers coincided with their transition from Indian fighters to lawmen. While serving in the Frontier Battalion officers' corps of Company D, Frank Jones supervised three of the four “great” captains of that era: J.A. Brooks, John H. Rogers, and John R. Hughes. Besides Austin Ira Aten and his younger brothers Calvin Grant Aten and Edwin Dunlap Aten, Captain Jones also managed law enforcement activities of numerous other noteworthy Rangers, such as Philip Cuney "P.C." Baird, Benjamin Dennis Lindsey, Bazzell Lamar "Baz" Outlaw, J. Walter Durbin, Jim King, Frank Schmid, and Charley Fusselman, to name just a few. Frank Jones’ law enforcing life was anything but boring. Not only would he find himself dodging bullets and returning fire, but those Rangers under his supervision would also experience gunplay. …
Date: March 2015
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

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Captain Frank Jones, a famed nineteenth-century Texas Ranger, said of his company’s top sergeant, Baz Outlaw (1854-1894), “A man of unusual courage and coolness and in a close place is worth two or three ordinary men.” Another old-time Texas Ranger declared that Baz Outlaw “was one of the worst and most dangerous” because “he never knew what fear was.” But not all thought so highly of him. In Whiskey River Ranger, Bob Alexander tells for the first time the full story of this troubled Texas Ranger and his losing battle with alcoholism. In his career Baz Outlaw wore a badge as a Texas Ranger and also as a Deputy U.S. Marshal. He could be a fearless and crackerjack lawman, as well as an unmanageable manic. Although Baz Outlaw’s badge-wearing career was sometimes heroically creditable, at other times his self-induced nightmarish imbroglios teased and tested Texas Ranger management’s resoluteness. Baz Outlaw’s true-life story is jam-packed with fellows owning well-known names, including Texas Rangers, city marshals, sheriffs, and steely-eyed mean-spirited miscreants. Baz Outlaw’s tale is complete with horseback chases, explosive train robberies, vigilante justice (or injustice), nighttime ambushes and bushwhacking, and episodes of scorching six-shooter finality. Baz met his end in a …
Date: April 2016
Creator: Alexander, Bob
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Texas Rangers: Lives, Legend, and Legacy

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Authors Bob Alexander and Donaly E. Brice grappled with several issues when deciding how to relate a general history of the Texas Rangers. Should emphasis be placed on their frontier defense against Indians, or focus more on their role as guardians of the peace and statewide law enforcers? What about the tumultuous Mexican Revolution period, 1910-1920? And how to deal with myths and legends such as One Riot, One Ranger? Texas Rangers: Lives, Legend, and Legacy is the authors’ answer to these questions, a one-volume history of the Texas Rangers. The authors begin with the earliest Rangers in the pre-Republic years in 1823 and take the story up through the Republic, Mexican War, and Civil War. Then, with the advent of the Frontier Battalion, the authors focus in detail on each company A through F, relating what was happening within each company concurrently. Thereafter, Alexander and Brice tell the famous episodes of the Rangers that forged their legend, and bring the story up through the twentieth century to the present day in the final chapters.
Date: July 2017
Creator: Alexander, Bob & Brice, Donaly E.
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Oral History Interview with Tammy Brake-Regitz, October 17, 2015

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Transcript of an interview with Canadian immigrant Tammy Brake-Regitz. Brake-Regitz talks about growing up in Canada and the decision to visit the United States in her twenties leading to her love of America and living the American Dream; Differences in Canada life and life in the United States; Her pursuit in a medical career; and decision to seek an American citizenship.
Date: October 17, 2015
Creator: Alexander, Matthew & Brake-Regitz, Tammy, 1972-
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Oral History Interview with Alessandro Buccilli, April 6, 2011

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Interview with Italian immigrant Alessandro Buccilli, Director of Marketing and Sales Administration for Peterbilt Motors Company, as part of the DFW Metroplex Immigrants Oral History Project. Buccilli discusses his family background in Rome, Italy, his education, employment in the U.S., the shifts in perceptions about Italy and the U.S., social responsibility, learning English, his perspectives on the importance of language and culture, raising American children, and his legacy. The interview also includes Buccilli's comparisons of opportunities, bureaucracy, culture, and national immigration debates in Italy and the U.S.
Date: April 6, 2011
Creator: Alexander, Matthew & Buccilli, Alessandro
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

Oral History Interview with Erio Enzo Pedini, November 15, 2015

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Transcript of an interview with Erio Enzo Pedini, an immigrant from the Republic of San Marino. Pedini recounts memories growing up in the Republic of San Marino and going to school in Italy; Coming to America in 1958 and the differences in cultures and lifestyles; Living and working in Detroit, Michigan; becoming a U.S. citizen; moving to Dallas, Texas; and working in the building industry.
Date: November 15, 2015
Creator: Alexander, Matthew & Pedini, Erio Enzo 1946-
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library

The Original Guitar Hero and the Power of Music: the Legendary Lonnie Johnson, Music, and Civil Rights

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Lonnie Johnson (1894–1970) was a virtuoso guitarist who influenced generations of musicians from Django Reinhardt to Eric Clapton to Bill Wyman and especially B. B. King. Born in New Orleans, he began playing violin and guitar in his father’s band at an early age. When most of his family was wiped out by the 1918 flu epidemic, he and his surviving brother moved to St. Louis, where he won a blues contest that included a recording contract. His career was launched. Johnson can be heard on many Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong records, including the latter’s famous “Savoy Blues” with the Hot Five. He is perhaps best known for his 12-string guitar solos and his ground-breaking recordings with the white guitarist Eddie Lang in the late 1920s. After World War II he began playing rhythm and blues and continued to record and tour until his death. This is the first full-length work on Johnson. Dean Alger answers many biographical mysteries, including how many members of Johnson’s large family were left after the epidemic. He also places Johnson and his musical contemporaries in the context of American race relations and argues for the importance of music in the fight for civil …
Date: April 2014
Creator: Alger, Dean
Object Type: Book
System: The UNT Digital Library